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Mexican Embassy Unveils Commemorative Plaque to a Filipino Man Who Fought in the Mexican War of Independence

Mexican Embassy Unveils Commemorative Plaque to a Filipino Man Who Fought in the Mexican War of Independence
Embamex Filipinas

MANILA, Philippines — The Embassy of Mexico in the Philippines on Sept. 27 unveiled a commemorative plaque dedicated to Ramon Fabie, a Filipino who fought in the Mexican War of Independence in 1810.

The Mexican embassy said in a news release that it recognizes Fabie’s contribution to the “self-determination of Mexico” and looks to emphasize the “robust and important” links between Mexico and the Philippines.

Mexican ambassador Gerardo Lozano Arredondo
Mexican ambassador Gerardo Lozano Arredondo

Mexican ambassador Gerardo Lozano Arredondo led the ceremony, and officials from the National Historical Commission of the Philippines, Department of Foreign Affairs and the Intramuros Administration were also present at the event.

Ambassador Lozano remembered the life of Fabie, who studied at the Colegio de Minería in Mexico City under the faculty granted to Filipinos, as declared in the Royal Order assumed on November 15, 1788.

Fabie, who belonged to a wealthy family in Paco, Manila, joined the insurgent army led by the founding father of Mexico, Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, in September 1810. He was appointed lieutenant colonel of infantry, and he participated in the defense of the city of Guanajuato, directing the manufacture of arms and ammunition. When Hidalgo was defeated, Fabie and the other rebel officers were hanged by the Spanish royalist forces on November 28 of the same year.

Ambassador Lozano emphasized the importance of Fabie in Mexico, having his name inscribed in bronze letters on one of the walls of the Palacio de Minería in Mexico City.

Some streets in Mexico and a square have been named after Fabie.

“Telephone/Eye Catcher”

The Mexican embassy also unveiled “Telephone/Eye Catcher,” an artwork by the Filipino painter Veronica Ibarreta, as a “gesture of friendship” between the two countries.

The said events are part of the 200th anniversary of the consummation of the Mexican Independence.


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