This article is available in Spanish.

Learning a new language can definitely open up new opportunities. In the case of Spanish, Filipino professionals can earn more in the BPO industry. If you fluently speak the language, there are many Spanish jobs in the Philippines — you just need to know where to find them.

Here’s a quick tip: There are many of them on several Facebook groups. One group called “Multilingual/Bilingual Jobs PH” even has over 10,000 members as of the writing. The groups “Spanish Business And Jobs In The Philippines” and “Bilingual Jobs Philippines” can also be gold mines.

If, however, working in the BPO industry is not your jam, there are still other ways to put your Spanish skills to use. But first, let’s explore the booming demand of Filipino Spanish speakers in the call centers industry.

Call Center Agent

The Philippines is undoubtedly the BPO center of the world, and it’s not difficult to see why. Since Filipinos are multilingual and their accent can sound “neutral,” they are the top choice for global companies seeking customer service solutions.

But did you know that there is a booming local market for Spanish-speaking call center agents as well?

If you search the databases of popular job portals like Jobstreet and Indeed, you’ll find a lot of companies hiring Filipinos who can speak Spanish. These companies pay thrice compared with English-speaking agents. Now that’s something you shouldn’t miss.

This is definitely a perfect time to brush up your Spanish conversational skills. And in case you need a school to get started, Hola Amigos in Makati is a foreign language center that caters to BPO professionals.

Some companies discourage native Spanish speakers — preferring Filipino ones — so there’s very little competition in this game.

Spanish Teacher

Interestingly, some schools have also offered Spanish as an elective course or subject. Hence, some are also hiring Spanish teachers.

If you are qualified to teach Spanish (like passing the DELE test and getting an ELE certification), this is something you shouldn’t miss.

Social Media Specialist

Some companies also recognized the power of over 560 million Spanish speakers worldwide (second-most-spoken language in the world). Hence, they are now hiring Spanish speakers to do marketing jobs.

This is an exciting opportunity for those who love to use social media.

Translator

Although Spanish is not dominating in this area yet, some local companies are already hiring Spanish speakers to translate articles for them.

This Spanish woman moved all the way from Spain to the Philippines to work as a translator for a non-governmental organization. “I ended up accepting a job offer in Quezon City and left my whole life behind to work for a year as a translator for a Philippine NGO,” she wrote in her blog.

Writer or Journalist

If you are a Spanish-speaking freelance writer or journalist, you can certainly pitch article ideas to international news outlets or publications. The pay varies per outlet, and they usually give you a byline. This is the best way to build a portfolio as a writer.

Here at La Jornada Filipina, we accept freelance article pitches, and here’s how much we pay.

To give you an idea of what we’re interested in publishing, here’s a list:

  • Hard- or soft-news articles about the Philippines and its relationship to Spanish-speaking world
  • Thought-provoking, first-person pieces from members of the Filipino diaspora in Spain and Latin America
  • Strong and sound opinion pieces on issues about colonialism, heritage and identity
  • Long-form and in-depth stories about Fil-Hispanic culture, history or heritage
  • Fun listicles about Fil-Hispanic culture

Spanish jobs in the Philippines are not limited to call center agents. Finding one might be easier said than done, but it’s worth it. “There are many bilingual opportunities here in the Philippines and just as other skills that we learn and we acquire, languages can also be learned and mastered in time,” says Danica Bermas, who works for a multinational financial institution.


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